7 Reasons Dairy Has Become the New Gluten

A recent systematic review of observational studies looked at the relationship between obesity and cardiometabolic disease. Researchers concluded those who ate full-fat dairy had NO greater risk for heart disease or diabetes than low-fat dairy eaters.

The review, published in the European Journal of Nutrition, examined 25 studies, 18 of which found that those who consumed full-fat dairy weighed less or had less risk for obesity. None of the 25 studies reflected favorably on low-fat dairy. [1]

Likewise, a study last year found people who consumed higher levels of saturated fat in dairy products were less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. [2] Such findings debunk the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) long-standing nutritional recommendations that we consume three cups of low-fat dairy a day. [3]

Turns out we have become seriously misled. When manufacturers remove fat from dairy, both the flavor and that food’s ability to make you feel full and satisfied are yanked, too. Less fat almost always means more sugar.

“Despite what those milk-mustachioed celebrities in those ‘Got Milk?’ ads have been telling us for years, humans have no nutritional requirement for milk, and it may be doing us more harm than good because of all the sugar even plain non-fat milk contains,” notes a 2013 study by Harvard pediatrician David Ludwig published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics. [4]

Over the past few years, gluten has deservedly earned a bad rep. Is it now time to likewise evaluate dairy? Based on nearly three decades working with food intolerances, I find most people do better without dairy and especially milk. 

I’m not just talking lactose intolerance, which alone affects about 75 percent of the world’s population. [5] As these following 7 reasons reveal, dairy is far from a perfect food. Read on to Reason #1

3/8/2018 10:00:00 PM
JJ Virgin
Written by
Celebrity Nutrition & Fitness Expert JJ Virgin helps clients lose weight fast by breaking free from food intolerances and crushing their sugar cravings. She is author of New York Times Bestsellers The Virgin Diet: Drop 7 Foods, Lose 7 Pounds, Just 7 Days, The Virgin Diet Cookbook: 150 Easy and Delicious Recipes to Lose W...
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When I lived on the farm l got milk straight from the cow until 20 years ago when I moved to town. I drink 4 gallons of whole milk everyweek. In 2013 I was in a bad wreak that broke my back and neck and crushed my spine l been to 7 neurosurgeons and they will not touch me because how my spine is. And they don't know how l am walking. They asked me how did l have strong and health bones and I told them I drink whole milk everyday. They said if they do surgery l will be in a wheelchair for the rest of my life and there is a big chance that l won't make it. So the milk dose do the body good.
Posted by David Kelley
What about soy milk? I drink that once in awhile because I not only like the taste, but it is supposedly good for you in small amounts. Is that a lie too? You can't seem to trust ANYONE these days.
Posted by Vinny Amatucci
I am sensitive to casein and cane sugar but have been making for myself a quite good hot chocolate. Here's the recipe:

1 cup So Delicious Unsweetened Coconut Milk (Almond milk would also work.)
3 teaspoons TCHO Natural Cocoa Powder (It's organic!)
6 tiny scoops 365 Organic Stevia Extract Powder (The tiny plastic scoop comes in the bottle.)
Dash of iodized sea salt

I get all the ingredients from my local Whole Foods Market, but any health food store would probably have most of these. After a few minutes of stirring this combination around over low heat, pressing the cocoa bits against the side of a pan to break them up, the hot chocolate is ready to drink. Enjoy!
Posted by Marjorie Rosenfeld
Thank you for saying what I have been saying for years. I nursed my girls exclusively for 17 months each and then DIDNT go to cows milk. The girls are healthy as a horse and rarely are sick. For cheese we have goat stuff, much easier to digest. Coconut milk, hemp milk, alternatives galore!
Posted by Gen
Can you provide a better reference for #6? Citing Wellness.com is potentially circular since this article itself is appearing on Wellness.com. I am not disparaging the assertion, but would like to confirm the source.
Posted by Rich
We have an 8-year old and a 5-year old and I'm happy to say that many times our milk goes bad before it gets consumed. My wife and I don't drink milk and our kids have not loved it for a long time. As a matter of fact, the only time they'll drink it is if we make them chocolate milk, which we'll do occasionally as a treat, or with cereal (which they don't eat often).

The beverages of choice in our house are straight up water and unsweetened iced tea that we brew ourselves. Our kids prefer the water, hands down.

Glad to see some honest science coming out nowadays that we consumers can rely on, hopefully.
Posted by Bryan Moore
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