Thyroid extract

background

Thyroid extract is a type of glandular nutritional supplement derived from animal thyroid tissue. Glandulars and other tissue extracts have played roles in traditional medicine and are thought to improve the function of the specific gland consumed.
Although thyroid extract has been traditionally used to replace patients' normal thyroid activity, limited research does not support the use of thyroid extract for hypothyroidism. Thyroid extracts are still used by some practitioners, but most practitioners now use synthetic thyroid hormones.

Related Terms

Armour Thyroid®, Bio-Throid®, desiccated thyroid, desiccated thyroid extract, dry thyroid extract, glandular, glandular thyroid, homologous thyroid gland, human crude thyroid extract, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, levothyroxine, levothyroxine sodium, liothyronine, LOCO X112, L-thyroxine, natural thyroid, natural thyroid hormone, Nature-Throid, Naturethroid®, raw thyroid, T3, T4, Thyranon®, thyroid BP, thyroid subcellular fractions, thyroid USP, thyreoideum, Thyroideum siccum, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, Westhroid®.

evidence table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
 
Cancer (thyroid) (Grade: C)
Thyroid extract has been used traditionally to replace patients' normal thyroid activity. Limited research suggests that thyroid extract may increase survival in patients with thyroid cancer. More studies are needed in this area before conclusions can be made.
Hypothyroidism (Grade: C)
Thyroid extract has been used traditionally to replace patients' normal thyroid activity. Limited research does not support the use of thyroid extract for hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland). More studies are needed in this area before conclusions can be made.
Infertility (Grade: C)
According to human research, thyroid extract may increase the incidence of pregnancy in infertile patients due to luteal-phase deficiency. More studies are needed in this area before conclusions can be made.