Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)

background

Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) is found in Europe and Asia, mainly in eastern Europe and central Asia. The plant's orange fruit and the oil from its pulp and seeds have been used in the past to treat many conditions, such as skin and digestive problems and coughs. Promising early evidence supports the use of sea buckthorn for dry eyes, burns, and scaly, itchy rashes.
The antioxidant effects of sea buckthorn are well known. These benefits may affect the impact of sea buckthorn on cancer, heart disease, immune function, inflammation, liver disorders, injuries caused by radiation, and eye disorders.
There is a lack of high quality information on the side effects of sea buckthorn.

Related Terms

2-Methyl-chiro-inositol, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, acetic acid, aekol, alkaloids, almindelig havtorn (Danish), alpha-linolenic acid, amino acid, Amritscherl (German), anthocyanin, arabinose, argasse (French), argouse (French), argousier (French), artificial sea-buckthorn oil, ascorbic acid, ash, Audorn (German), baie d'argousier (French), baie d'hippophaé (French), beta-carotene, beta-sitosterol, buckthorn, caffeic acid, campherol, carbohydrates, carotene, carotenoids, casuarinin, catechin, Chharma, cinnamic acid, citric acid, common sea-buckthorn, dehydroascorbic acid, dhar-bu (Lao), dhurchuk (Hindi), duindoorn (Dutch), Dünendorn (German), Elaeagnaceae (family), Elaeagnus rhamnoides (L.) A.Nelson, epigallocatechin, espinheiro-marítimo (Portuguese - Brazil), espino armarillo (Spanish), espino falso (Spanish), ethyl glucose, European buckthorn, Fasanbeere (German), fat, ferulic acid, fiber, finbar (Swedish), finnbär (Swedish), flavo-glycoside, flavones, flavonoid, flavonol aglycones, flavonol glycosides, flavonols, folate vitamers, fructose, fruit acid, galactose, gallic acid, gallocatechin, gemeiner Sanddorn (German), gewöhnlicher Sanddorn (German), glucose, glucuronides, grisset, Haffdorn (German), hafþyrnir (Icelandic), harmalol, harmol, havtidse (Danish), havtorn (Swedish, Danish), Hippophae angustifolia Lodd., Hippophae littoralis Salisb., Hippophae rhamnoides, Hippophae rhamnoides cv. Indian Summer, Hippophae rhamnoides oil, Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. sinensis, Hippophae rhamnoideum Saint-Lager, Hippophae sibirica Lodd., Hippophae stourdziana Szabó, homoktövis (Hungarian), isolinoleic acid, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin-3-galactoside, isorhamnetin-3-glucoside, isorhamnetin-3-rutinoside, kaempherol, kárpáti homoktövis (Hungarian), klintepil (Danish), klittorn (Danish), Korallenbeere (German), L-ascorbic acid, leucocyanidin, leucodelphinidin, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, lycopene, malic acid, mannitol, meerdorn, methyl-myo-inositol, mineral salt, minerals, myo-inositol, myricetin, oblepikha, oil, oleic acid, oleum Hippophae, olivella spinosa (Italian), Osyris rhamnoides Scop., paeonin, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, p-coumaric acid, pectin, pentamethylquercetin, peonin, phenolic acids, phosphatides, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phylloquinone, physalien, polyunsaturated fatty acids, Prielbrusie, proteins, protocatechuic acid, pulp oil, purging thorn, quercetin, quinic acid, rakytník řešetlákovitý (Czech), RH-3, Rhamnoides hippophae Moench, rhamnose, rokitnik, rokitnik zwyczajny (Polish), rote Schlehen (German), saccharose, salicylic acid, sallow thorn, Sandbeere (German), Sanddorn (German), sandthorn, sandtidse (Danish), sandtidsel (Danish), sandtorn (Danish), SBL-1, sceitbezien, seabuckthorn, sea-buckthorn, seabuckthorn oil, sea-buckthorn oil, seabuckthorn powder, seed oil, seed residues of Hippophae rhamnoides L., Seedorn (German), serotonin, sha ji (Chinese), shaji (Chinese), silverbuske (Swedish), star-bu (Lao), stearic acid, sterols, støggved (Norwegian), Stranddorn (German), succinic acid, sugar, syringetin, tænnved (Norwegian), tannic acid, tanning agents, tannins, terpenoids, tetrahydrofolate, tindved (Danish, Norwegian), tinnan (Norwegian), tinne (Norwegian), tinnved (Norwegian), tocopherols, tocotrienols, tørn (Norwegian), tornan (Norwegian), tørri (Norwegian), total flavones of Hippophae rhamnoides L. (TFH), trans-resveratrol, triterpenoids, tyrni (Finnish), unsaturated fatty acids, vanillic acid, vitamin B, vitamin B12, vitamin C, vitamin E, water, Weidendorn (German), Weisseldorn (German), xanthophylls, yellow spine, zeaxanthin.
Note: Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) is different from alder buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula), common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), and cascara or California buckthorn (Rhamnus purshiana), although these plants have similar common names.

evidence table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
 
Atopic dermatitis (Grade: B)
Sea buckthorn seed oil and pulp oil may improve symptoms of atopic dermatitis, a skin disorder that causes scaly, itchy rashes. However, results are mixed. More research is needed before a strong conclusion can be made.
Dry eyes (Grade: B)
Sea buckthorn contains fatty acids and antioxidants that may reduce the risk of dry eyes. Early evidence supports the use of sea buckthorn oil for dry eyes. However, more research is needed in this area to confirm these findings.
Antioxidant (Grade: C)
The antioxidant effects of sea buckthorn are well known. These benefits may affect the impact of sea buckthorn on cancer, heart disease, immune function, inflammation, liver disorders, injuries caused by radiation, and eye disorders. Although not well studied in humans, early research suggests that sea buckthorn may protect against radiation and oxidative stress. However, results are inconsistent. Further study is needed.
Burns (Grade: C)
Early results suggest that sea buckthorn oil may reduce pain, swelling, and oozing caused by burns and may improve healing. However, more high-quality studies are needed to confirm these results.
Cirrhosis (Grade: C)
Early results suggest that sea buckthorn may improve liver health in people with cirrhosis (scarring of the liver caused by chronic disease). Although promising, more high-quality research is needed in this area.
Common cold (Grade: C)
Sea buckthorn has been used in the past to prevent and treat colds. However, there is a lack of human research to support its use for this purpose. Further study is needed before a firm conclusion can be made.
Diabetes (Grade: C)
Early study suggests that sea buckthorn preparations (including berries, berry oil, and extract) may lower blood sugar levels. However, more research is needed on the possible benefit of sea buckthorn alone.
Heart disease (Grade: C)
The antioxidant effects of sea buckthorn are well known. These benefits may affect the impact of sea buckthorn on heart disease. Early research suggests that it may reduce chest pain and improve heart function in people with ischemic heart disease (reduced blood supply to the heart). However, further study is needed.
High blood pressure (Grade: C)
Early research suggests that sea buckthorn may lower blood pressure. However, strong evidence is lacking and further study is needed before firm conclusions can be made.
High cholesterol (Grade: C)
Sea buckthorn has been studied as a possible treatment for high cholesterol. However, strong evidence is lacking and more research is needed in this area.
Pneumonia (Grade: C)
Early research suggests that sea buckthorn may improve symptoms of pneumonia in children. More research is needed in this area before a firm conclusion can be made.
Stomach ulcer (Grade: C)
Sea buckthorn has been studied as a possible treatment for ulcers on the lining of the stomach or intestines. Early human research suggests that sea buckthorn oil may benefit peptic ulcers when used with other therapies. More high-quality studies are needed to confirm these findings.
Weight loss (Grade: C)
Sea buckthorn may help decrease weight and waist circumference in overweight or obese people. More high-quality research is needed in this area.