Moringa Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to Moringa species.

Side Effects and Warnings

Moringa leaves and seeds are likely safe when taken, based on the amounts used in typical dietary or traditional health practices.
Moringa may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders, and in those taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
Moringa may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Moringa may stimulate the heart and increase blood pressure. Other research suggests that moringa may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people with heart or blood vessel disorders, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements to treat these conditions.
Moringa may increase the flow of urine. Caution is advised when using other agents that may also increase urine flow.
To purify water, use cautiously during outbreaks of intestinal infections.
Avoid consuming moringa root bark and ethanol extracts of moringa leaves and seeds, due to toxic effects. Only minute amounts of moringa root flesh may be consumed due to its spirochin content. Spirochin is a compound that may cause loss of nerve function.
Moringa may increase the risk of developing an enlarged thymus gland. Avoid in people with thymus disorders and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements to treat these conditions.
Moringa may increase the risk of neck swelling due to an enlarged thyroid gland. Avoid use of high doses in areas deficient in iodine.
Avoid doses of moringa crude extract in doses greater than 46 milligrams per kilogram of body weight weekly, or seven milligrams per kilogram daily. High doses may have a negative impact on liver and kidney function.
Moringa may prevent implantation and induce abortion. Avoid use in women who are pregnant or trying to conceive. However, in human research of pregnant women ≥ 36 weeks gestation, adverse effects associated with use of moringa leaf to promote breast milk production were lacking.
Avoid use in children, due to a lack of safety information.
Avoid with known allergy or sensitivity to Moringa species.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Moringa may prevent implantation and induce abortion. It is not recommended for use in women who are pregnant or trying to conceive. However, in human research of pregnant women ≥ 36 weeks gestation, adverse effects associated with use of moringa leaf to promote breast milk production were lacking. Moringa leaf has been used traditionally to promote breast milk production. Products such as Natalac, Go-Lacta®, and Prolacta® have been studied for this use. In human research, moringa leaf was shown to increase breast milk production in the early period after childbirth. More research is needed in this area.

dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

Factors such as age and health may affect the amount of Moringa prescribed to different people.
For asthma, three grams of dry, powdered Moringa oleifera seed kernel has been taken by mouth twice daily for three weeks.
As a breast milk stimulant, the following has been taken by mouth: a moringa capsule (commercial preparation containing 250 milligrams of moringa leaves) every 12 hours on days 3 to 5 after childbirth; 2 moringa capsules (Prolacta®, 350 milligrams per capsule) 3 times daily until ≥ 3 days before delivery.

Children (under 18 years old)

Insufficient available evidence.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Moringa may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
Moringa may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking insulin or drugs for diabetes by mouth should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Moringa may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be increased in the blood and may cause increased effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. People using any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.
Moringa may also interact with acetaminophen, agents that affect blood pressure, agents that affect the heart, agents that affect the kidneys, agents that affect the immune system, agents that affect the nervous system, agents that affect the stomach, agents that are toxic to the liver, agents used to increase breast milk, antiarsenic agents, antiasthma drugs, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antifungals, antiparasitics, antivirals, aspirin, carbon tetrachloride, chelating agents (chemical agents that bind metal particles), drugs that reduce eye clouding, fertility agents, inflammation-lowering agents, lipid-lowering agents, mosquito repellants, pain-relievers, penicillin, pentobarbitone, radiation therapy, rifampin, scopolamine, spasm-reducing agents, testosterone, thyroid hormones, tuberculosis treatments, urine-promoting agents, and wound-healing agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Moringa may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Gingko biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
Moringa may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
Moringa may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may become too high in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system.
Moringa may also interact with agents that affect blood pressure, antiarsenic herbs and supplements, antiasthma herbs and supplements, antibacterials, anticancer agents, antifungals, antioxidants, antiparasitics, antivirals, calcium, chelating agents (chemical agents that bind metal particles), fertility agents, herbs and supplements that affect the heart, herbs and supplements that affect the kidneys, herbs and supplements that affect the immune system, herbs and supplements that affect the nervous system, herbs and supplements that affect the stomach, herbs and supplements that reduce eye clouding, herbs and supplements that are toxic to the liver, herbs and supplements used to increase breast milk, inflammation-lowering herbs, lipid-lowering agents, mosquito repellants, pain-relievers, probiotics (healthy bacteria), spasm-reducing agents, tamarind, urine-promoting agents, vitamins A and E, and wound-healing herbs and supplements.