Maral root Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to maral root (Leuzea carthamoides), its constituents, or members of the Asteraceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

Information on the safety, efficacy, or side effects of maral root is limited to observations from traditional medicine usage or expert opinions. Additional research is needed in these areas.
Maral root may cause an adverse skin reaction following sun exposure.
Maral root may affect the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that may affect the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
Use cautiously in combination with antidepressants, due to its potential to diminish depressive symptoms.
Use cautiously in combination with immunosuppressants (compounds that diminish the activity of the immune system), as it may stimulate the immune system.
Use cautiously in obese persons or in combination with weight loss supplements, due to a potential to increase muscle mass, organ weight, and body weight.
Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of available safety information.
Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to maral root (Leuzea carthamoides), its constituents, or members of the Asteraceae family.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Maral root is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of available scientific evidence.
Preliminary studies have examined the potential toxic effects of maral root on embryos. Further details are lacking.

dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

For depression, four ounces of maral root has been taken by mouth 4-5 times daily for two months or longer.
For giardiasis (parasitic infection commonly associated with diarrhea), five milligrams of ecdysten has been taken by mouth three or four times daily for 10 days.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for maral root in children.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Maral root may affect the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
Maral root may interact with anabolic agents, antianxiety drugs, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungals, antiparasitics, antiulcer agents, cardiovascular agents, drugs that affect the immune system, erectile dysfunction agents, hormonal agents, performance-enhancing agents, and weight loss agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Maral root may affect the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
Maral root may interact with anabolics, antibacterials, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antifungals, antioxidants, antiparasitics, antiulcer herbs and supplements, antianxiety herbs and supplements, cardiovascular herbs and supplements, erectile dysfunction herbs and supplements, herbs and supplements that affect the immune system, hormonal herbs and supplements, performance-enhancing agents, and weight loss agents.