L-threonine

background

Threonine is an important amino acid that is a building block for proteins in the body. Some foods that are high in L-threonine are cottage cheese, watercress, sesame seeds, soy, meat and fish, lentils, eggs, milk, and gelatin.
L-threonine has been studied in the treatment of nerve disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, and muscle spasms. However, more research is needed.

Related Terms

2-Amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid, glycine, L-(-)-threonine, L-thréonine (French), serine, (S)-threonine, threonine, thréonine (French), threoninum (Latin), treonina (Spanish).

evidence table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
 
Muscle spasms (Grade: B)
L-threonine taken by mouth for two weeks has been shown to benefit people who have muscle spasms. More research is needed.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (Grade: C)
L-threonine has been studied in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a severe progressive nerve disorder. However, there is not enough evidence to support this use at this time. Some studies suggest that L-threonine may decrease survival in people with ALS. More research is needed.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) (Grade: C)
There is not enough evidence to support the use of L-threonine for muscle spasms in people who have multiple sclerosis. More research is needed before a conclusion may be made.
Spinal cord injury (Grade: C)
L-threonine has been studied for use in treating muscle spasms related to spinal cord injuries. Although there is some supporting evidence, more research is needed before a conclusion may be made.