Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus). In some patients, jackfruit is a Bet v 1 (birch pollen allergen)-related food allergy.

Side Effects and Warnings

Jackfruit has few reported side effects. Use cautiously in patients with birch pollen allergies.
Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit may increase coagulation. Caution is advised in patients with blood disorders. Jackfruit may also alter glucose tolerance, and patients with diabetes should consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.
Jackfruit seeds may have immunostimulative effects. Use cautiously in patients using immunosuppression therapy or with transplanted tissues.
Use cautiously in patients attempting to become pregnant as jackfruit seeds may markedly inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction) in males. However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence or fertility.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Jackfruit is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit seeds may transiently inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction). However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence or fertility.

dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is no proven safe or effective dose of jackfruit in adults. A hot-water extract of Artocarpus heterophyllus leaves equivalent to 20 grams per kilogram of starting material has been taken by mouth for high blood sugar/glucose intolerance.

Children (younger than 18 years)

There is no proven safe or effective dose of jackfruit in children.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Various jackfruit plant parts, including the bark, wood, leaves, fruit, and seeds, may exhibit a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. Caution is advised in patients taking antibiotics due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit seeds may increase the risk of bleeding when taking with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin ®, Advil ®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
Jackfruit leaves may improve glucose tolerance in normal and type 2 diabetes patients. Caution is advised when using medications that may also alter blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit may inhibit the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is conflicting data regarding jackfruit's antifungal activity. Caution is advised in patients taking other antifungal agents due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit may exhibit inhibitory activity with a cytopathic effect towards herpes simplex virus type 2, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Caution is advised in patients taking other antiviral agents due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit seeds may markedly inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction) in males. However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence and fertility. Caution is advised in patients taking jackfruit with agents for sexual dysfunction or agents with sexual side effects.
Jackfruit and jackfruit seeds may have immunostimulative effects. Use cautiously when taking immunomodulators or immunostimulants.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Various jackfruit plant parts, including the bark, wood, leaves, fruit, and seeds, may exhibit a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. Caution is advised when taking other herbs or supplements with antibacterial activity due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit seeds may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit may inhibit the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, results are conflicting. Nonetheless, caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with antifungal activity due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit may exhibit inhibitory activity with a cytopathic effect towards herpes simplex virus type 2, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus. Caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with antiviral activity due to possible additive effects.
Jackfruit seeds may markedly inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction) in males. However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence or fertility. Caution is advised in patients taking jackfruit with herbs or supplements for sexual dysfunction, or herbs or supplements with sexual side effects.
Jackfruit leaves may improve glucose tolerance in normal and type 2 diabetes patients. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplement that may alter blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
Jackfruit and jackfruit seeds may have immunostimulative effects. Use cautiously when taking immunomodulators or immunostimulants.