Bishop's weed

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Bishop's weed (Ammi majus) is an annual plant in the Apiaceae family, often cultivated for its attractive flowering stems. It is also a commonly used spice in India.
Bishop's weed contains psoralens, which are substances that react with ultraviolet (UV) light and darken the skin. Psoralens are currently used together with UV light therapy to treat skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo. Oral 8-methoxypsoralen, a drug made from bishop's weed, has been described as the drug of choice in photochemotherapy for vitiligo and psoriasis.
Early evidence suggests that psoralen compound 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) from Ammi majus may help treat vitiligo (leukoderma). However, case reports also mention potential phototoxic skin damage, phototoxic dermatitis, and pigmentary retinopathy caused by Ammi majus.
There is currently insufficient evidence available in humans to support the use of Ammi majus for any medical condition. High-quality human studies are needed before any strong conclusion can be made about its safety and effectiveness.

Related Terms

5-MOP, 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), 8-MOP, Ammi majus, Ammi majus Linn, Apiaceae (family, formerly Umbelliferae), bergapten, bishop's flower, bishopsweed, bullwort, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, cinnamic acid, false queen Anne's lace, ferulic acid, furanocoumarins, gallic acid, greater ammi, lady's lace, large bullwort, methoxsalen, oxypeucedanin, phenolic acids, photochemotherapy, psoralens, tannic acid, Umbelliferae (former family), vanillic acid, xanthotoxin.
Note: Bishop's weed is also a widely used common name for other Apiaceae family plants, such as goutweed, also known as bishop's goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria L.), and khella (Ammi visnaga).
The prescription drug methoxsalen was developed from bishop's weed.

evidence table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
 
Psoriasis (Grade: C)
8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a compound found in bishop's weed, has been used to treat psoriasis, although there is some concern that it may cause eye damage. There is a lack of available research on the safety of bishop's weed. High-quality human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.
Tinea versicolor (Grade: C)
8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a compound found in bishop's weed, has been used to treat tinea versicolor. However, high-quality human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.
Vitiligo (leukoderma) (Grade: C)
Early research suggests that 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), a compound found in bishop's weed, may help treat vitiligo (leukoderma). However, high-quality human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.