Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria, Agrimonia procera) Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to agrimony.

Side Effects and Warnings

Agrimony is likely safe since its leaves are used as a substitute for tea. It is also likely safe when applied on the skin. No significant adverse effects for agrimony have been documented. When used as recommended for a short-term, agrimony is considered to be safe.
Agrimony is listed by the Council of Europe as a natural source of food flavoring. This use is possibly safe since it can be added to foodstuffs in small quantities with a possible limitation of an active principle (not yet specified) in the final product.
Agrimony is possibly unsafe when used orally (by mouth) or topically (applied on the skin) in excessive amounts due to its high tannin content. In theory, agrimony may cause photodermatitis, low blood pressure, and nausea.
The high amount of tannins (up to 21%) in agrimony may lead to gastrointestinal upset, hepatic necrosis (death of liver cells), nephrotoxicity (damage to the kidneys) or increased risk of developing esophageal (of the esophagus) cancer if used chronically. Avoid in patients with diarrhea caused by an underlying disease. Agrimony should be used only for mild and acute diarrhea. Patients who tend to develop constipation very easily should also avoid agrimony.
Isocoumarins have been found in the roots of agrimony; there may be an increased risk for bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking agents that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Due to a lack of toxicity data, excessive use of agrimony is possibly unsafe and should be avoided during pregnancy and breastfeeding because of the possible effects on the menstrual cycle.

dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is no proven safe of effective dose for agrimony. Agrimony has traditionally been given as a tea, tincture, infusion or extract. Examples of traditional doses that have been used include: 1-3 milliliters of liquid extract (1:1 in 25% alcohol) per day; 2-4 grams dried herb infusion three times per day; and 1-4 milliliters tincture (1:5 in 45% alcohol) three times daily.
When applied on the skin, a poultice has been applied several times daily using approximately 10% water extract, which is prepared by boiling agrimony at low heat for 10-20 minutes.

Children (younger than 18 years)

There is no proven safe of effective dose for agrimony in children, and use is not recommended.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Due to isocoumarins found in the roots of agrimony, agrimony may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
Agrimony may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Agrimony may lower blood pressure. Therefore, it is possible that the hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) effect may be additive with drugs used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Excessive doses of agrimony might cause hypotension, interfering with therapy for hypertension or hypotension.
Agrimony may be used to treat symptoms of menopause along with other herbs so it may be likely that it contains an estrogenic-like component. Therefore, it should not be used in patients on some form of hormone-replacement therapy, such as birth control pills.
Since agrimony contains up to 21% tannins, chronic ingestion may result in nephrotoxicity (damage to the kidneys).

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Due to isocoumarins found in the roots of agrimony, there is a possibility that agrimony may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
Agrimony may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
Agrimony may lower blood pressure. Therefore, it is possible that the hypotensive (blood pressure lowerng) effect may be additive with drugs used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). Excessive doses of agrimony might cause hypotension, interfering with therapy for hypertension or hypotension.
Agrimony may be used to treat symptoms of menopause along with other herbs so it may be likely that it contains an estrogenic-like component. Therefore, it should not be used in patients on some form of hormone-replacement therapy.
Since agrimony contains up to 21% tannins, chronic ingestion may result in nephrotoxicity (damage to the kidneys).