Bear's garlic (Allium ursinum) Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to bear's garlic or other members of the Alliaceae family such as garlic, leeks, shallots, or onions.

Side Effects and Warnings

Bear's garlic is likely safe when consumed in food amounts.
Although there is a lack of known toxicities associated with consumption of bear's garlic, several reports of colchicine poisoning, resulting in gastroenterocolitis and sometimes fatal multiple organ failure, have been reported in people who consumed autumn crocus that was mistaken for bear's garlic. Toxic effects appear to be more severe when autumn crocus leaves are eaten after being cooked and when eaten by people ages 65 and older.
Bear's garlic is not listed on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There is a lack of sufficient data on the use of bear's garlic during pregnancy or lactation.

dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for bear's garlic in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for bear's garlic in children.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Bear's garlic has demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity and may increase the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).
Bear's garlic may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders; dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Bear's garlic may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs or supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto.
Bear's garlic may increase the activity of herbs with anti-inflammatory activity.