Health and Wellness News

(HealthDay News) - If you can't eat wheat flour, there's a wide variety of alternatives available. The American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests: - Almond flour, potato flour, rice flour or rye flour. Amaranth flour, ground from the ancient seed. Soy flour or flaxseed flour. Oat flour, barley flour or buckwheat flour. Spelt flour, made from an ancient grain that's related to wheat. Sorghum...
(HealthDay News) - It can be frightening for parents and baby when a little one needs a medical test. The University of Michigan Health System offers these suggestions to help keep the infant calm: - Offer plenty of gentle touches, and keep your voice quiet and soothing. Don't make any loud noises or sudden movements. Make sure baby can see you at all times, even when being held by the medical staff....
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Working rotating night shifts may pose a threat to your health, a new study suggests. The study defined rotating shift work as at least three nights spent working each month, in addition to days and evenings worked in the month. In the new study, researchers led by Dr. Eva Schernhammer of Harvard Medical School tracked 22 years of data from about 75,000 nurses...
TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Though it's never been scientifically confirmed, conventional wisdom has it that winter is the season of sniffles. Now, new animal research seems to back up that idea. It suggests that as internal body temperatures fall after exposure to cold air, so too does the immune system's ability to beat back the rhinovirus that causes the common cold. "It has been long...
TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Pain-relieving treatments for knee arthritis all work better than doing nothing - but it's hard to point to a clear winner, a new research review concluded. Using data from almost 140 studies, researchers found all of the widely used arthritis treatments - from over-the-counter painkillers to pain-relieving injections - brought more relief to aching knees over...
TUESDAY, Jan. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) - As a new cold snap sends temperatures plunging across much of the United States, one expert offers tips on how to stay warm and safe. "With the proper knowledge and precautions, most [cold-related] pain and suffering can be prevented," Dr. Barry Rosenthal, chair of emergency medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y., said in a hospital news release....
(HealthDay News) - Eczema is a common condition that can cause dry, red and itchy skin. The National Eczema Association says common eczema triggers in children include: - Having very dry skin. Having contact with an irritant or allergen, from smoke or pets to detergents. Having a skin infection. Drooling among babies, causing facial eczema. Exposing skin to cold, dry air. Copyright © 2015 HealthDay....
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Despite concerns about potentially dangerous interactions between cancer treatments and herbs and other supplements, most cancer doctors don't talk to their patients about these products, new research found. Fewer than half of cancer doctors - oncologists - bring up the subject of herbs or supplements with their patients, the researchers found. Many doctors cited...
(HealthDay News) - An ice storm can weigh heavily on power lines, knocking out power for an extended period. The SafeElectricity.org website suggests these tips to stay warm and safe: - Stay indoors. If you go outside, stay away from downed power lines. Dress warmly in layers. Close doors to any rooms that you aren't using. If you're using an alternate heat source, follow safety guidelines and make...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - For teens who suffer a mild concussion, more rest may not be better - and may be worse - in aiding recovery from the brain injury, new research suggests. The researchers compared five days of strict rest to the traditionally recommended day or two of rest, followed by a gradual return to normal activities as symptoms disappear. The Medical College of Wisconsin...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Young adults who engage in just one bout of binge drinking may experience a relatively quick and significant drop in their immune system function, a new small study indicates. It's well-known that drinking ups injury risk, and this new study suggests that immune system impairment might also hamper recovery from those injuries. "There's been plenty of research,...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Owning a pet may play a role in social skills development for some children with autism, a new study suggests. The findings are among the first to investigate possible links between pets and social skills in kids with an autism spectrum disorder - a group of developmental disorders that affect a child's ability to communicate and socialize. "Research in the area...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - A smartphone in a child's bedroom may undermine good sleep habits even more than a TV, new research suggests. A study of more than 2,000 elementary and middle-school students found that having a smartphone or tablet in the bedroom was associated with less weekday sleep and feeling sleepy in the daytime. "Studies have shown that traditional screens and screen...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - The current flu season, already off to a rough start, continues to get worse, with 43 states now reporting widespread flu activity and 21 child deaths so far, U.S. health officials said Monday. And, the predominate flu continues to be the H3N2 strain - one that is poorly matched to this year's vaccine, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention....
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Women can dramatically lower their likelihood of heart disease prior to old age by following healthy living guidelines, according to a large, long-term study. The study found that women who followed six healthy living recommendations - such as eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise - dropped their odds of heart disease about 90 percent over 20 years,...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - The notion of potentially healthy obesity is a myth, with most obese people slipping into poor health and chronic illness over time, a new British study claims. The "obesity paradox" is a theory that argues obesity might improve some people's chances of survival over illnesses such as heart failure, said lead researcher Joshua Bell, a doctoral student in University...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Over time, regularly eating whole wheat bread, oatmeal or other whole grains may add years to your lifespan, a new Harvard-led study concludes. Whole grains are so healthy that a person's risk of an early death drops with every serving added to a daily diet, according to findings published online Jan. 5 in -JAMA Internal Medicine. "We saw clear evidence that...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Newborns with significant jaundice are not likely to develop a rare and life-threatening type of cerebral palsy if American Academy of Pediatrics' treatment guidelines are followed, according to a new study. Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin due to high levels of the liver-produced pigment bilirubin. In most cases, jaundice develops among newborns because...
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: - Travelers From Mali No Longer Require Ebola Screening: U.S. Officials - Airline passengers from Mali will no longer have to undergo screening for Ebola symptoms when they arrive in the United States, and will no longer be required to enter the U.S. through one of five designated airports, federal...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Overweight teens trying to lose weight for their own well-being are more likely to succeed than those who do it to impress or please others, according to a new study. Researchers at Brigham Young University (BYU) said parents should help their children focus on their health, rather than social pressures to shed unwanted pounds. "Most parents have the view that...
MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) - People who suffer strokes in July - the month when medical trainees start their hospital work - don't fare any worse than stroke patients treated the rest of the year, a new study finds. Researchers investigating the so-called "July effect" found that when recent medical school graduates begin their residency programs every summer in teaching hospitals, this...
FRIDAY, Jan.2, 2015((HealthDay News) - It started as a deadly but little-known outbreak in West Africa, but the lethal and unchecked spread of the Ebola virus dominated U.S. headlines for much of 2014, making it one of the year's top health news stories. According to the latest World Health Organization figures, nearly 20,000 reported cases of Ebola - including more than 7,700 deaths - have occurred...
SUNDAY, Jan. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Students drank three times more water after water dispensers were installed in the cafeterias of New York City schools. Researchers looked at nine public elementary, middle and high schools that received the water dispensers and a control group of students at 10 schools that didn't get them. The students' water consumption was checked before the water dispensers...
FRIDAY, Jan. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) - The number of bicyclist fatalities in the United States is increasing, particularly among adults in major cities, a recent study shows. After decreasing from 1975 to 2010, the number of bicyclists killed annually increased by 16 percent from 2010 to 2012. More than 700 bicyclists died on U.S. roads in 2012, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association....
FRIDAY, Jan. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) - Although many people enjoy gathering around a fire during cold winter months, fires that aren't built properly can affect air quality and people's health, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Smoke coming out of the chimney is one sign that a fire isn't burning efficiently. Smoke from wood contains fine particles, known as fine particle...