Alexander technique Evidence

safety

There is a lack of published reports of serious complications as a result of Alexander technique instruction. It has been suggested that this technique may be less effective in patients with learning disabilities or mental illness. The Alexander technique has been used by pregnant women and during delivery without reports of complications, although safety in these situations has not been established scientifically.
The Alexander technique should not be used as the only treatment approach for medical or psychiatric conditions, and should not delay the time it takes to consider more proven therapies.

evidence table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.
 
Asthma (chronic) (Grade: C)
There is not enough scientific evidence to make a strong recommendation for the use of the Alexander technique in asthma patients. More study is needed in this area.
Back pain (Grade: C)
There is limited evidence in this area, and no firm conclusion can be drawn based on scientific research.
Balance (Grade: C)
Limited research suggests that functional reach performance may be improved through Alexander technique instruction, particularly in people older than 65 years. Better quality evidence is needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Lung function (Grade: C)
There is a small amount of research on the effects of the Alexander technique on lung function in healthy people and musicians who play wind instruments. Until better evidence is available, it remains unclear if the Alexander technique improves lung capacity.
Parkinson's disease (Grade: C)
Early research suggests that Alexander technique instruction may improve fine and gross movements and reduce depression in patients with Parkinson's disease. Additional human research is needed before a clear recommendation can be made.
Posture in children (Grade: C)
The Alexander technique has been suggested as a means to improve children's postural development. The long-term effects of such instruction are not known.
Stuttering (Grade: C)
There is not enough scientific evidence to make a strong recommendation for the use of the Alexander technique in patients who stutter. More study is needed in this area.
Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chronic pain (Grade: C)
Early case series data suggest that Alexander technique instruction may reduce symptoms in people with TMJ chronic pain. More human research is needed before a clear recommendation can be made.