Guggul (Commifora mukul) Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in people with a known allergy or sensitivity to guggul (Commiphora mukul), its parts, or other members of the Burseraceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

Guggul is likely safe when taken in typical doses for up to six months.
Guggul may affect the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
Guggul may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or low blood sugar, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, and medication adjustments may be necessary.
Use cautiously in people with thyroid disorders or those taking thyroid agents. Guggul may affect thyroid function and cause thyroid problems.
Use cautiously in people who have stomach or intestine disorders. Guggul may cause diarrhea, loose stools, nausea, upset stomach, and vomiting.
Use cautiously in people taking cholesterol-lowering agents. Guggul may affect cholesterol levels.
Guggul may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's "cytochrome P450" enzyme system.
Use cautiously in people taking beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers. Guggul may decrease the effects of these agents.
Use cautiously in people taking red yeast rice, green tea extract, or usnic acid. Guggul may cause liver failure and inflammation when taken with these.
Avoid using large amounts of guggulsterones with estrogens. Guggul may affect estrogen receptors and cause side effects.
Avoid in children, due to a lack of safety information.
Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, or in women who are trying to get pregnant. Guggul may cause abortion.
Avoid in people with a known allergy or sensitivity to guggul (Commiphora mukul), its parts, or other members of the Burseraceae family.
Guggul may also cause allergic skin reactions, anxiety, belching, changes in weight, chemical changes in reproductive organs, headache, hiccup, increased hemoglobin (blood protein that carries oxygen) in the urine, muscle fiber breakdown, rash, restlessness, and shortness of breath.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There is a lack of scientific evidence on the use of guggul during pregnancy or breastfeeding.
Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, or in women who are trying to get pregnant. Guggul may cause abortion.

dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

A proven effective dose for guggul in adults is lacking. Guggulipid is thought to be safe in healthy people at normal doses for up to six months.
To treat acne, a dose of guggulipids equal to 25 milligrams of guggulsterone has been taken by mouth twice daily for six weeks, and for up to three months.
To treat high cholesterol, the following doses have been taken by mouth: 25 milligrams of guggulsterone 2-3 times daily for eight weeks; 400-500 milligrams of guggulipid three times daily for 4-12 weeks; 4.5-16 grams of gum guggul daily in single or divided doses for 12-16 weeks; and 500 milligrams of guggul fraction A 2-3 times daily for up to 34 weeks or 1.5 grams daily for 75 weeks.
For weight loss, the following doses have been taken by mouth: 2-4 Medohar® tablets (each containing 250 milligrams of guggul) three times daily for 30 days; 500 milligrams of guggul fraction A three times daily after meals for up to 12 weeks; and 4 grams of gum guggul daily in three divided doses for four weeks.
To treat osteoarthritis, 500 milligrams of guggul (3.5 percent guggulsterones) have been taken by mouth three times daily for three months.
To treat rheumatoid arthritis, 3 grams of guggul have been taken by mouth daily in divided doses for four months.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for guggul in children.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Guggul may affect the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
Guggul may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Guggul may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's "cytochrome P450" enzyme system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be altered in the blood, and may cause altered effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. People using any medications should check the package insert, and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.
Guggul may also interact with anti-arthritis agents, antibiotics, anticancer agents, anti-inflammatories, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, cholesterol-lowering agents, heart agents, hormonal agents, nervous system agents, osteoporosis agents, skin agents, stomach and intestine agents, thyroid hormones, and weight loss agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Guggul may affect the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
Guggul may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's "cytochrome P450" enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may be altered in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system.
Guggul may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
Guggul may also interact with anti-arthritis herbs and supplements, antibacterials, anticancer herbs and supplements, anti-inflammatories, antioxidants, cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements, green tea, herbs and supplements for the heart, hormonal herbs and supplements, Inula racemosa, nervous system herbs and supplements, osteoporosis herbs and supplements, red yeast rice, skin herbs and supplements, stomach and intestine herbs and supplements, thyroid herbs and supplements, usnic acid, and weight loss herbs and supplements.