Chrysanthemum Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to chrysanthemum, its constituents, or members of the Asteraceae/Compositae family, such as dandelion, goldenrod, ragweed, sunflower, and daisies.
There are numerous case reports and studies showing that allergies to chrysanthemum are very common, and chrysanthemum may be the strongest sensitizer of the cultivated Compositae plants, with an estimated 60% of Europeans being allergic. Patients may be sensitive to pollen, leaves, flowers, stems, the whole plant, and even chrysanthemum oleoresin extract and chrysanthemum oil of turpentine. Occupational exposure is associated with allergy. Symptoms of allergy may include asthma, skin rash, eczema, photosensitivity, hay fever, inflammation of the sinuses, or hives.
There have also been cases of cross-sensitivity between chrysanthemum and feverfew, tansy, chamomile, Artemisia vulgaris, Liliaceae plants, tulip, Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum), Gerbera, lettuce, Senecio cruentus, Aster, Matricaria, Solidago, daisy, dandelion, Parthenium hysterophorus L., Xanthium strumarium L., Helanthus annuus L., Frullania dilatata, Frullania tamarisci, Arnica longifolia Eaton, Arnica montana L., primrose, sunflower, ragweed, the pollen of the Amaryllidaceae family (Alstroemeria and Narcissus), and mugwort.

Side Effects and Warnings

Chrysanthemum is likely safe when pesticide- and preservative-free flowers are used in food amounts. There is a lack of information about its use medicinally for any indication.
Clinical reports suggest that pyrethrins, which are chemicals found in chrysanthemum, may cause skin inflammation or eye disorders, such as corneal (part of the eye) erosion. Poisoning from pyrethrins can occur, and is usually due to accidental or intentional ingestion, but may also be caused by chronic exposure. Adverse effects are related to toxicity in the nervous system. There is no known antidote for pyrethrin and pyrethroid poisoning; treatment is symptomatic and supportive. Two deaths from acute asthma have been attributed to pyrethrins. Avoid large acute or chronic doses of ingested pyrethrin. Also avoid pyrethrin in patients with compromised liver function, epilepsy, asthma, or who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
Use chrysanthemum cautiously in patients taking medication for gout (foot inflammation), cancer, or HIV.
Use cautiously in patients with compromised immune systems or taking immunomodulators.
Avoid in patients with photosensitivity or taking photosensitizers.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Chrysanthemum is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven effective dose for chrysanthemum in adults. Jiangtangkang (a chrysanthemum product) 8 grams, three times per day for six months has been used in the treatment of diabetes.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for chrysanthemum in children.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Chrysanthemum may have anesthetizing (pain numbing), antibacterial, anticancer, antifungal, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. Caution is advised in patients taking agents with similar effects due to potential additive effects.
Chrysanthemum may inhibit certain enzymes that play a role in gout (foot inflammation). Use cautiously with medications that treat gout.
Chrysanthemum may have anti-HIV activity. Use cautiously with antiretroviral medications, due to possible additive effects. Chrysanthemum may also interact with immunosuppressants.
Pyrethrins from Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium have been studied in the treatment of the herpes virus. Although there is a lack of information in humans, caution is advised in patients taking herpes agents.
The chrysanthemum product jiangtangkang may improve fasting blood glucose (sugar) and post-meal blood glucose and increase sensitivity to insulin in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. Although there is conflicting evidence in this area, caution is advised in patients taking agents for diabetes or hypoglycemia.
Chrysanthemum may cause photosensitization and may cause hyperpigmentation, skin inflammation, or make a patient more sensitive to laser treatment. Use cautiously with photosensitizing agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Chrysanthemum may have anesthetizing (pain numbing), antibacterial, anticancer, antifungal, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. Caution is advised in patients taking agents with similar effects due to potential additive effects.
Chrysanthemum may inhibit certain enzymes that play a role in gout (foot inflammation). Use cautiously with herbs or supplements used in the treatment of gout.
Chrysanthemum may have anti-HIV activity. Use cautiously with antiretroviral herbs or supplements, due to possible additive effects. Chrysanthemum may also interact with immunosuppressants.
Pyrethrins from Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium have been studied in the treatment of the herpes virus. Although there is a lack of information in humans, caution is advised in patients taking herpes agents.
The chrysanthemum product jiangtangkang may improve fasting blood glucose (sugar) and post-meal blood glucose and increase sensitivity to insulin in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. Although there is conflicting evidence in this area, caution is advised in patients taking agents for diabetes or hypoglycemia (high or low blood sugar).
Chrysanthemum may cause photosensitization and may cause hyperpigmentation, dermatitis, or make a patient more sensitive to laser treatment. Use cautiously with herbs and supplements with similar effects.