Bovine colostrum Dosing and Safety

safety

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to dairy products.

Side Effects and Warnings

Adverse reactions to bovine colostrum supplements are mainly gastrointestinal and may include nausea and vomiting, bloating, and diarrhea. In general, bovine colostrum is generally well tolerated. However, bovine colostrum is a potential source of environmental contaminants, such as pesticides.
Heat-denatured bovine immunoglobulin may be a risk factor for atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). However, it is not clear how use of bovine colostrum relates to this risk. Use cautiously in patients with atherosclerosis.
Bovine colostrum is a source of IGF-1, which has been found to correlate with the risk of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer in men, premenopausal breast cancer in women, and lung cancer in both men and women. Not all studies agree with these findings and it is not clear how this relates to the use of bovine colostrum. Avoid in patients with, or at risk of, cancer due to potential for IGF-1-induced increased risk for certain types of cancer.
Avoid in pregnant and breastfeeding women due to a lack of information.
Use cautiously in individuals with immune system disorders due to the potential for immune system effects of bovine colostrum.
Use cautiously in individuals on medications, such as anti-diarrhea agents (e.g. immodium), insulin, and central nervous system agents (amphetamines, caffeine), due to potential for reduced or increased efficacy.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Bovine colostrum is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Bovine colostrum is a potential source of environmental contaminants, such as pesticides.

dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven effective dose of bovine colostrum. The dose amount and dosage formulations vary. Doses of 400-5,000 milligrams taken 1-3 times per day in tablet, powder, or solution form for up to 10 days have been reported.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven effective dose of bovine colostrum in children. Various doses and preparations have been studied that are generally well tolerated with minor side effects. A common dosing range is 7-20 grams of bovine colostrum per day in divided doses for up to 14 days. Hyperimmune milk concentrate (20 grams daily) has also been administered for five days in children experiencing diarrhea as a result of shigella infection. Other studies have studied purified immunoglobins (antibodies) from bovine colostrum for up to one month, but no benefit was found.

interactions

Interactions with Drugs

In general, there are no reported drug interactions associated with bovine colostrum. However, the number of compounds in bovine colostrum is large, although levels may be small, and each may have unknown effects or interactions with other drugs.
Preliminary studies have indicated bovine colostrum's antimicrobial effects. Thus, bovine colostrum may have additive effects when taken with antibiotics, and caution is advised.
Preliminary evidence suggests that the presence of insulin in bovine colostrum is at least partially responsible for some of its effects. Thus, using insulin in combination with bovine colostrum may have additive effects. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
Due to the antidiarrheal effects of bovine colostrum, caution is advised when combining with other antidiarrheal agents because the combination may have additive effects.
Bovine colostrum is a source of IGF-1. Several studies have found that IGF-1 levels correlate with the risk of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer in men, premenopausal breast cancer in women, and lung cancer in both men and women. Not all studies agree with these findings, and it is not clear how this relates to the use of bovine colostrum. Nevertheless, caution is advised in patients taking anticancer agents and bovine colostrum due to unknown effects.
Human colostrum is a rich source of the antioxidant CoQ10. It is not known if bovine colostrum also contains CoQ10. Caution is advised in patients taking antioxidant agents due to possible additive effects.
Bovine colostrum may have antiviral activity. Caution is advised in patients taking antiviral agents due to possible additive effects.
Bovine colostrum may affect the brain's mood-regulating chemicals (serotonin and dopamine). Thus, combined use with other agents that affect the central nervous system, such as amphetamines or caffeine, may have additive or contradictory effects.
There is conflicting data regarding the use of bovine colostrum for exercise performance enhancement. It is unclear whether bovine colostrum would interact with other exercise performance enhancers in humans.
Colostrum may have effects on the immune system, although clinical significance in humans is unknown. Use cautiously with other immunomodulators.
Caution is also advised in patients taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) due to possible additive effects.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Preliminary studies have indicated bovine colostrum's antimicrobial effects. Thus, bovine colostrum may have additive effects when taken with herbs and supplements with antibacterial effects, and caution is advised.
Due to the antidiarrheal effects of bovine colostrum, caution is advised when combining with other antidiarrheal agents because the combination may have additive effects.
In theory, colostrum may alter the effects of herbs with anti-inflammatory effects.
Bovine colostrum is a source of IGF-1. Several studies have found that IGF-1 levels correlate with the risk of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer in men, premenopausal breast cancer in women, and lung cancer in both men and women. Not all studies agree with these findings, and it is not clear how this relates to the use of bovine colostrum. Caution is advised in patients with or at risk for cancer, or taking herbs or supplements with anti-cancer effects.
Preliminary evidence suggests that bovine colostrum may have antiviral activity, and caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements with antiviral activity due to possible additive effects.
Bovine colostrum may affect the brain's mood-regulating chemicals (serotonin and dopamine). Thus, combined use with other herbs that affect the central nervous system may have additive or contradictory effects.
Human colostrum contains CoQ10. Thus, it is likely that bovine colostrum also contains CoQ10. Combined use with CoQ10 supplements or herbs or supplements with antioxidant activity may have additive effects.
There is conflicting data regarding the use of bovine colostrum for exercise performance enhancement. It is unclear whether bovine colostrum would interact with other exercise performance enhancers in humans.
Results from in vitro studies suggest that the presence of insulin in bovine colostrum is at least partially responsible for some of its effects. Thus, using herbs or supplements with hypoglycemic (blood sugar lowering) effects in combination with bovine colostrum may have additive effects.
Colostrum may have effects on the immune system, although clinical significance in humans is unknown. Use cautiously with other immunomodulator herbs or supplements.